1. Special Needs in Children

    1. Blood Conditions

      1. Blood Disorder
      2. Hemophilia
      3. Hepatitis B Positive
      4. Hepatitis C
      5. HIV Positive
      6. Lead Exposure
      7. Lymphedema
      8. Sickle Cell Anemia
      9. Thalassemia
    2. Chromosome Disorders

      1. Cystic Fibrosis
      2. Down Syndrome
      3. Genetic Syndrome
      4. PKU
      5. Teratoma
      6. Turner Syndrome
    3. Congenital Heart Defects

      1. Atrial Septal Defect (ASD)
      2. Heart Defect
      3. Tetralogy of Fallot
    4. Craniofacial Conditions

      1. Apert Syndrome
      2. Cleft lip or palate
      3. Hemifacial Microsomia
    5. Developmental Needs

      1. Apraxia of Speech and Muteness
      2. Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD's)
      3. Cognitive Delays
      4. Failure to Thrive
      5. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
      6. Growth Delay
      7. Motor Delays
      8. Premature Birth
      9. Psychomotor Development Retardation (PDR)
      10. Speech Delay
    6. Digestive System Conditions

      1. Hernia
      2. Megacolon
    7. Hearing

      1. Deaf
      2. Hearing Impairment
      3. Microtia and Atresia
    8. Neurological Conditions

      1. Cerebral Palsy
      2. Dyskinesia
      3. Epilepsy
      4. Hydrocephalus
      5. Microcephaly
      6. Seizure Disorder/ Epilepsy
    9. Orthopedic Conditions

      1. Amniotic Band Syndrome / Missing Limbs
      2. Arthrogryposis
      3. Brachial Plexus Injury
      4. Club foot
      5. Digit Difference
      6. Dwarfism
      7. Flexion Deformity
      8. Funnel Chest / Pigeon Breast
      9. Limb Differences
      10. Osteogenesis Imperfecta
      11. Radial Club
      12. Rickets
      13. Scoliosis
      14. Spina Bifida
      15. Torticollis
      16. Wheelchair Dependent
      17. Wheelchair Dependent
    10. Skin Conditions

      1. Albinism
      2. Burns
      3. Congenital Blue Nevus
      4. Congenital Nevi
      5. Eczema
      6. Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB)
      7. Ichthyosis
      8. Port Wine Stains
    11. Urogenital Conditions

      1. Ambiguous Genitalia
      2. Anal Atresia / Imperforate Anus
      3. Hypospadias
      4. Incontinence
      5. Kidney Issues
    12. Vision

      1. Blind
      2. Cataracts
      3. Lazy Eye / Amyblyopia
      4. Missing Eye
      5. Nystagmus
      6. Ptosis
      7. Strabismus
      8. Visual Impairment


1257 Adoption Stories


406 Children with Down Syndrome

Down Syndrome

Chromosome Disorders

Facts About Down Syndrome

Adopting a child diagnosed with Down Syndrome can seem daunting at first.  But did you know that hundreds of families adopt a child with this condition every year?  

Down syndrome is a common genetic variation which usually causes delay in physical, intellectual and language development. The exact causes of the chromosomal rearrangement and Waiting Children with Down Syndromeprimary prevention of Down syndrome are currently unknown. Down syndrome is one of the leading clinical causes of cognitive delay in the world - it is not related to race, nationality, religion or socio-economic status. There is wide variation in mental abilities, behavior and physical development in individuals with Down syndrome.

Down Syndrome Adoption Article: Adopting Our Most Precious Treasure

Each individual has his/her own unique personality, capabilities and talents. 30% - 50% of the individuals with Down syndrome have heart defects and 8% - 12% have gastrointestinal tract abnormalities present at birth. Most of these defects are now correctable by surgery. Individuals with Down syndrome benefit from loving homes, early intervention, inclusive education, appropriate medical care and positive public attitudes. In adulthood, many persons with Down syndrome hold jobs, live independently and enjoy recreational opportunities in their communities.

Down Syndrome Challenges

Children with Down syndrome may also have:

  • Poor muscle tone
  • Broad, short hands with a single crease in the palm
  • Relatively short fingers
  • Excessive flexibility

 Infants born with Down syndrome may be of average size, but typically they grow slowly and remain smaller than other children of similar age. Children with Down syndrome also have some degree of mental retardation, ranging from mild to moderate.

Down Syndrome Treatment

  • There's no medical treatment for Down syndrome that will provide a cure. But children with Down syndrome do benefit from medical help and early interventions, starting in infancy.
  • If your child has Down syndrome, you'll likely become acquainted with a team of doctors that may include a pediatric cardiologist, a gastroenterologist, a developmental pediatrician and other specialists. These doctors can detect and treat complications of Down syndrome, such as heart defects, gastrointestinal problems and hearing problems.

Resources for Down Syndrome is an Adoption Advocacy Website. We are the largest and oldest, online website helping people to adopt from multiple countries. Through RainbowKids, thousands of special needs and waiting children have found families... READ ABOUT US




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