ADOPTION EVENTS

  1. Special Needs in Children

    1. Blood Conditions

      1. Blood Disorder
      2. Hemophilia
      3. Hepatitis B Positive
      4. Hepatitis C
      5. HIV Positive
      6. Lead Exposure
      7. Lymphedema
      8. Sickle Cell Anemia
      9. Thalassemia
    2. Chromosome Disorders

      1. Cystic Fibrosis
      2. Down Syndrome
      3. Genetic Syndrome
      4. PKU
      5. Teratoma
      6. Turner Syndrome
    3. Congenital Heart Defects

      1. Atrial Septal Defect (ASD)
      2. Heart Defect
      3. Tetralogy of Fallot
    4. Craniofacial Conditions

      1. Apert Syndrome
      2. Cleft lip or palate
      3. Hemifacial Microsomia
    5. Developmental Needs

      1. Apraxia of Speech and Muteness
      2. Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD's)
      3. Cognitive Delays
      4. Failure to Thrive
      5. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
      6. Growth Delay
      7. Motor Delays
      8. Older Child (above the age of 3 years)
      9. Premature Birth
      10. Psychomotor Development Retardation (PDR)
      11. Speech Delay
      12. Toddler age (18 months & 3 years)
    6. Digestive System Conditions

      1. Hernia
      2. Megacolon
    7. Hearing

      1. Deaf
      2. Hearing Impairment
      3. Microtia and Atresia
    8. Neurological Conditions

      1. Cerebral Palsy
      2. Dyskinesia
      3. Epilepsy
      4. Hydrocephalus
      5. Microcephaly
      6. Seizure Disorder/ Epilepsy
    9. Orthopedic Conditions

      1. Amniotic Band Syndrome / Missing Limbs
      2. Arthrogryposis
      3. Brachial Plexus Injury
      4. Club foot
      5. Digit Difference
      6. Dwarfism
      7. Flexion Deformity
      8. Funnel Chest / Pigeon Breast
      9. Limb Differences
      10. Osteogenesis Imperfecta
      11. Radial Club
      12. Rickets
      13. Scoliosis
      14. Spina Bifida
      15. Torticollis
      16. Wheelchair Dependent
      17. Wheelchair Dependent
    10. Skin Conditions

      1. Albinism
      2. Burns
      3. Congenital Blue Nevus
      4. Congenital Nevi
      5. Eczema
      6. Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB)
      7. Ichthyosis
      8. Port Wine Stains
    11. Urogenital Conditions

      1. Ambiguous Genitalia
      2. Anal Atresia / Imperforate Anus
      3. Hypospadias
      4. Incontinence
      5. Kidney Issues
    12. Vision

      1. Blind
      2. Cataracts
      3. Lazy Eye / Amyblyopia
      4. Missing Eye
      5. Nystagmus
      6. Ptosis
      7. Strabismus
      8. Visual Impairment

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2 Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

Sickle Cell Anemia

Blood Conditions


Facts About Sickle Cell Anemia

Sickle cell anemia is an inherited form of anemia — a condition in which there aren't enough healthy red blood cells to carry adequate oxygen throughout your body.

Normally, your red blood cells are flexible and round, moving easily through your blood vessels. In sickle cell anemia, the red blood cells become rigid and sticky and are shaped like sickles or crescent moons. These irregularly shaped cells can get stuck in small blood vessels, which can slow or block blood flow and oxygen to parts of the body.

There's no cure for most people with sickle cell anemia. However, treatments can relieve pain and help prevent further problems associated with sickle cell anemia.

Sickle Cell Anemia Challenges

Signs and symptoms of sickle cell anemia often don't appear until an infant is at least 4 months old and may include:

  • Anemia. Sickle cells are fragile. They break apart easily and die, leaving you without a good supply of red blood cells. Red blood cells usually live for about 120 days before they die and need to be replaced. But sickle cells die after an average of less than 20 days. This results in a lasting shortage of red blood cells (anemia). Without enough red blood cells in circulation, your body can't get the oxygen it needs to feel energized. That's why anemia causes fatigue.
  • Episodes of pain. Periodic episodes of pain, called crises, are a major symptom of sickle cell anemia. Pain develops when sickle-shaped red blood cells block blood flow through tiny blood vessels to your chest, abdomen and joints. Pain can also occur in your bones. The pain may vary in intensity and can last for a few hours to a few weeks. Some people experience only a few episodes of pain. Others experience a dozen or more crises a year. If a crisis is severe enough, you may need to be hospitalized.
  • Hand-foot syndrome. Swollen hands and feet may be the first signs of sickle cell anemia in babies. The swelling is caused by sickle-shaped red blood cells blocking blood flow out of their hands and feet.
  • Frequent infections. Sickle cells can damage your spleen, an organ that fights infection. This may make you more vulnerable to infections. Doctors commonly give infants and children with sickle cell anemia vaccinations and antibiotics to prevent potentially life-threatening infections, such as pneumonia.
  • Delayed growth. Red blood cells provide your body with the oxygen and nutrients you need for growth. A shortage of healthy red blood cells can slow growth in infants and children and delay puberty in teenagers.
  • Vision problems. Some people with sickle cell anemia experience vision problems. Tiny blood vessels that supply your eyes may become plugged with sickle cells. This can damage the retina — the portion of the eye that processes visual images.

Sickle Cell Anemia Treatment

The goal of treatment is to manage and control symptoms, and to limit the number of crises. People with sickle cell disease need ongoing treatment, even when not having a crisis. It is best to get care from health care that take care of many patients with sickle cell anemia.

People with this condition should take folic acid supplements. Folic acid helps make new red blood cells.

Treatment for a sickle cell crisis includes:

  • Blood transfusions (may also be given regularly to prevent stroke)
  • Pain medicines
  • Plenty of fluids

Other treatments for sickle cell anemia may include:

  • Hydroxyurea (Hydrea). Helps reduce the number of pain episodes (including chest pain and breathing problems) in some people
  • Antibiotics. Help prevent bacterial infections, which are common in children with sickle cell disease

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