1. Special Needs in Children

    1. Blood Conditions

      1. Blood Disorder
      2. Hemophilia
      3. Hepatitis B Positive
      4. Hepatitis C
      5. HIV Positive
      6. Lead Exposure
      7. Lymphedema
      8. Sickle Cell Anemia
      9. Thalassemia
    2. Chromosome Disorders

      1. Cystic Fibrosis
      2. Down Syndrome
      3. Genetic Syndrome
      4. PKU
      5. Teratoma
      6. Turner Syndrome
    3. Congenital Heart Defects

      1. Atrial Septal Defect (ASD)
      2. Heart Defect
      3. Tetralogy of Fallot
    4. Craniofacial Conditions

      1. Apert Syndrome
      2. Cleft lip or palate
      3. Hemifacial Microsomia
    5. Developmental Needs

      1. Apraxia of Speech and Muteness
      2. Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD's)
      3. Cognitive Delays
      4. Failure to Thrive
      5. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
      6. Growth Delay
      7. Motor Delays
      8. Premature Birth
      9. Psychomotor Development Retardation (PDR)
      10. Speech Delay
    6. Digestive System Conditions

      1. Hernia
      2. Megacolon
    7. Hearing

      1. Deaf
      2. Hearing Impairment
      3. Microtia and Atresia
    8. Neurological Conditions

      1. Cerebral Palsy
      2. Dyskinesia
      3. Epilepsy
      4. Hydrocephalus
      5. Microcephaly
      6. Seizure Disorder/ Epilepsy
    9. Orthopedic Conditions

      1. Amniotic Band Syndrome / Missing Limbs
      2. Arthrogryposis
      3. Brachial Plexus Injury
      4. Club foot
      5. Digit Difference
      6. Dwarfism
      7. Flexion Deformity
      8. Funnel Chest / Pigeon Breast
      9. Limb Differences
      10. Osteogenesis Imperfecta
      11. Radial Club
      12. Rickets
      13. Scoliosis
      14. Spina Bifida
      15. Torticollis
      16. Wheelchair Dependent
      17. Wheelchair Dependent
    10. Skin Conditions

      1. Albinism
      2. Burns
      3. Congenital Blue Nevus
      4. Congenital Nevi
      5. Eczema
      6. Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB)
      7. Ichthyosis
      8. Port Wine Stains
    11. Urogenital Conditions

      1. Ambiguous Genitalia
      2. Anal Atresia / Imperforate Anus
      3. Hypospadias
      4. Incontinence
      5. Kidney Issues
    12. Vision

      1. Blind
      2. Cataracts
      3. Lazy Eye / Amyblyopia
      4. Missing Eye
      5. Nystagmus
      6. Ptosis
      7. Strabismus
      8. Visual Impairment


1257 Adoption Stories


No Children with Brachial Plexus Injury

Brachial Plexus Injury

Orthopedic Conditions

Facts About Brachial Plexus Injury

A brachial plexus injury occurs during birth when the neck is over-distended or one arm is stretched or caught in the birth canal. The injury can result in the tearing of tendons or muscles or even the breakage of bones. In some cases, the injury will heal on its own in about six months. For many children, however, the damage is permanent. The affected arm may be weak or paralyzed, depending on the extent of the damage.

Brachial Plexus Injury Challenges

  • Children born with this type of injury lead normal, active lives.
  • On-going therapy to strengthen the effected arm may be necessary.

Brachial Plexus Injury Treatment

To protect the affected arm from further injury and allow the body to repair some of the damage, swaddle an infant with a brachial plexus injury to keep the arm close to the chest or abdomen. The swaddling should not be so tight as to impair circulation. Do not lay the child down to sleep on the affected arm, as circulation is likely to be impaired in this limb. Passive range of motion exercises can keep the hand and elbow from contracting (drawing up). A physical therapist can treat the child and determine a therapy schedule that best serves the individual needs. These exercises must be done at home every day in order to achieve the maximum benefit. Some cases may require corrective surgery. If the child is left with a weak or paralyzed arm despite treatment, physical and occupational therapy can encourage independence through the performance of daily living activities with the assistance of adaptive equipment. This injury does not affect the intellect or growth of the child.

Articles Related to Brachial Plexus Injury is an Adoption Advocacy Website. We are the largest and oldest, online website helping people to adopt from multiple countries. Through RainbowKids, thousands of special needs and waiting children have found families... READ ABOUT US




Read all tweets © Copyright 2015, All Rights Reserved
Log in    |    Sign up    |    Home